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References

  1. You could see your bills reduced by up to 23%

    The average volume weighted wholesale electricity price, using BEIS’s Energy and Emissions Predictions 2019 (2024-40), with the addition of additional benefits (0.2p/kWh) is 6.3p/kWh. The forecast wholesale price for 2024 was increased to 8.4p/kWh to reflect current high prices. The wind farm’s estimated operating costs are 2p/kWh. 6.3p/kWh – 2p/kWh equals an average saving of 4.3p/kWh. The average residential retail electricity price, based on BEIS’s forecast (2024-2040) is 18.7p/kWh. 4.3p/kWh is 23% of 18.7p/kWh.

  2. Ripple is up to 65% cheaper than installing rooftop solar

    Based on costs set out in the Energy Savings Trust’s Rooftop Solar Calculator. The cost of installing a 3.5kWp solar PV system on the roof of a south west facing house in London is £4,788. This would generate 3,069kWh per year. The cost of purchasing 957 watts of a wind farm with Ripple, which would generate 3,069kWh per year is £1,689. This is 65% cheaper than the solar installation costs.

  3. How much could you save?

    Household size:

    Consumption estimates based on Ofgem’s revised Profile Class 1 electricity TDCVs.
    Super consumption estimate based on electricity required by a Nissan Leaf electric car (efficiency of 264Wh/mile) travelling 8,000 miles a year added to the high usage figure. 264Wh/mile x 8,000miles = 2,112kWh. 4,300kWh + 2,112kWh = 6,412kWh.

    Typical savings per year:

    The average volume weighted wholesale electricity price, using BEIS’s forecasted prices (2024-40), with the addition of additional benefits of 0.2p/kWh is 6.3p/kWh. Note - the forecast wholesale price for 2024 was increased to 8.4p/kWh to reflect the current high prices. The wind farm’s estimated operating costs are 2p/kWh. 6.3p/kWh - 2p/kWh equals a saving of 4.3p/kWh. The average BEIS forecast retail electricity price between 2023 and 2035 is 18.8p/kWh. The estimated 4.3p/kWh savings is 23% of 18.8p/kWh.

    CO2 Savings:

    Assuming 212gCO2 saved per kWh, based on the UK Governments conversion factors for company reporting of greenhouse gas emissions.

    Trees:

    The Woodland Carbon Code suggests an average of 350,000kgCO2 is sequestered per hectare of forest over 50 years, so 7,000kg per year. Forestry Research recommends planting 2,500 trees per hectare. For each tree planted 7,000/2,500 = 2.8kgCO2 captured each year. 12,776,392 / 2.8 = 4,500,000 trees.

  4. Your wind farm will save 12 million kgCO2 per year

    Assuming 212gCO2 saved per kWh, based on the UK Government’s conversion factors for company reporting of greenhouse gas emissions. Kirk Hill’s estimated yearly output is 60,266MWh. 212gCO2/kWh x 60,266MWh = 12,776,392kgCO2.

  5. That’s the same as taking 8,200 cars off the road

    Based on an average mileage of 7,400 miles per year and average CO2 emissions per gallon of 10.9kg for a small car with 52mpg. (10.9kgCO2pg / 52mpg) x 7,400miles/yr = 1,551kgCO2. 12,776,392kgCO2 / 1,551kgCO2 = 8,237 small cars, according to carbon independent.org.

  6. That’s the same as 12,000 people going vegan

    Based on a carbon saving of 1,089kg per person going vegan. 12,776,392kg / 1,089kg = 11,732 people. Scarborough et al 2014.

  7. That’s the same as the weight of 140,000 baby elephants

    According to National Geographic the average weight of a baby African elephant is 91kg. 12,776,392kg / 91kg = 140,399 elephants.

  8. A typical employee could save around 615kgCO2 per year, or 15tCO2 over a wind farm’s lifetime

    For a 2,900kWh share of the project with 212gCO2 saved per kWh, based on Ofgem’s Typical Domestic Consumption Values and the UK Government’s conversion factors for company reporting of greenhouse gas emissions. 2,900kWh x 212gCO2/kWh = 615kgCO2.

  9. 73% of workers want improved sustainability policies

    According to a survey of 1,000 office workers commissioned by TopLine Film.

  10. In less than 10 minutes, Kirk Hill wind farm will generate enough electricity to power the average UK home for 1 year

    At maximum power Kirk Hill wind farm generates 18.8MWh in an hour, or 313kWh per minute. Typical UK household uses 2,900kWh per year. 2,900kWh / 313kWh per minute = 9.26 minutes.
    Ofgem’s Typical Domestic Consumption Values for Gas and Electricity

  11. Over the last year 22% of the UK’s electricity has come from wind

    According to data from Drax Electric Insights.

  12. By 2030, 64% of the UK’s electricity could come from wind

    According to BloombergNEF’s New Energy Outlook 2019.

  13. Over 11,000 wind turbines in the UK

    According to RenewableUK’s Wind Energy Statistics.

  14. Electricity generation from wind power in the UK has increased by 715% from 2009 to 2020

    Based on analysis by the IPCC finding onshore wind to be the lowest CO2 source of power and BEIS’s Electricity Generation Costs 2020 report.

  15. 84% of people in the UK support onshore wind

    According to the BEIS’s Public Attitudes Tracker: Autumn 2021.

  16. The greenest and cheapest electricity in the UK

    Based on analysis by the IPCC, finding onshore wind to be the lowest CO2 source of power and BEIS’s Electricity Generation Costs 2020 report.

  17. Enjoy low, stable priced onshore wind power

    For projects commissioning in 2025 according to BEIS’s Electricity GenerationCosts 2020 report.

  18. Onshore wind is the lowest CO2 source of power

    According to analysis by the IPCC.

  19. The wind farm will save 12,750 tonnes of CO2 emissions each year

    Assuming 212gCO2 saved per kWh, based on the UK Government’s conversion factors for company reporting of greenhouse gas emissions. Kirk Hill’s estimated yearly output is 60,300MWh. 212gCO2/kWh x 60,266MWh = 12,776,392kgCO2 = 12,776 tonnes of CO2.

  20. One swoosh of the turbine’s blades could power your home for 8 hours

    At rated speed and assumes a typical household demand of 2,900kWh per annum Ofgem’s revised Profile Class 1 electricity TDCVs.

  21. 100% renewable electricity

    Electricity backed by 100% renewable sources, E.ON’s renewable generation assets, agreements with UK generators and the purchase of renewable electricity certificates. The electricity supplied to your home or business comes from the National Grid and DNOs.